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Do not let an internet search muddy your divorce

When modern consumers want information, they often turn to their computers, smartphones or tablets. In fact, according to a recent study, 82% of Americans report researching items before making even small purchases. 

Going through a divorce is not like buying a toaster, though. While there is usually nothing inherently wrong with looking for general information online, you do not want your internet search to complicate your divorce. For at least three reasons, an online hunt for divorce-related information may do just that. 

Incorrect information

There is no official authority to verify the authenticity and accuracy of online information. Sadly, much of what you read on the internet may be unreliable or incorrect. Furthermore, because family law changes regularly, the sources you find online may not have current information. 

If you rely on outdated, superseded or downright incorrect information during your divorce, you may make some major and costly mistakes. 

Incomplete details

Even if your online search takes you to a reliable site, details may be incomplete. Many divorce-related matters are simply too complex to describe in a limited space. Unless you read through statutes, court opinions, scholarly articles and other relevant sources, you may not have enough information to make important decisions about the end of your marriage. 

Unique facts

It is certainly possible to find complete and correct information online. Still, no two divorces unfold exactly in the same way. The end of your marriage is apt to have unique facts that may change the way law works in your situation. 

Put simply, without relevant legal experience, you may not understand how what you read online applies to your specific circumstances. 

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