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Study: Working women are more likely to remain wedded women

The so-called traditional family model includes the wife at home taking care of the kids and the husband "bringing home the bacon." While there is certainly nothing wrong with that model, especially if it works for some, it doesn't guarantee a happy marriage. In fact, a recent study reveals that women are less likely to initiate a divorce when they work outside the home.

The outcome is surprising to some who have thought of stay-at-home wives and mothers as likely to feel financially "trapped" because they don't earn money of their own. In theory, such women would worry about divorce and that spousal support wouldn't be enough to get by without their husbands.

According to sources, women initiate two-thirds of divorces. Men, therefore, initiate the remaining one-third of separations. A woman's likelihood to leave her husband is lower if she is employed. So even if a woman might have the finances to support herself and her family after divorce, if she is ultimately happy in her marriage she will not leave. Men reportedly are more likely to file for divorce if they are unemployed or stay-at-home fathers.

It goes to show that for marriage to work, it needs to be far more than a financial arrangement. The research suggests that mutual respect and companionship, as well as both partners fulfilling individual goals, seems to be key. And when it comes to choosing divorce, it is actually somewhat refreshing to hear that more people are making that brave decision for reasons deeper than their pockets.

Source

Myjoyonline.com: "Working women less likely to leave marriages - Study," Oct. 11, 2011

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